Maritime Art/Art collections of the Network members

Bremerhaven

Deutsches Schifffahrtsmuseum
The German Maritime Museum has a large art collection with about 3000 works of international maritime art from all eras, with a special focus on German maritime art of the 19th and 20th centuries. The collection is completed by a huge collection of historical maritime photographs from the early 20th century.

Historisches Museum Bremerhaven
The Historisches Museum Bremerhaven mainly collects works by artists who were born in Bremerhaven and its surroundings or who lived here at some time in their lives. The art collection comprises of 4000 paintings, drawings and graphics as well as the biographical bequests of a few painters. Maritime motifs of the ports, the shipyards or the rivers Weser and Geeste are particularly common in the collection.

München

Deutsches Museum
Since the founding of the Deutsches Museum München in 1903, works of art have been collected in order to complement the exhibitions of technical objects. In 1906, for example, Michael Zeno Diemer (1867–1939) carried out a series on the development of German shipbuilding. Watercolours of submarines where executed by Willy Stöwer (1864–1931), and Claus Bergen (1885–1964) painted several harbour views. The museum’s archive includes photographs and prints with portraits of seafarers, sailors and captains (see online: www.digiporta.net).

Oslo

Norsk Maritimt Museum / The Norwegian Maritime Museum
The Norwegian Maritime Museum’s collections of maritime art consist of about 1500 objects. The variation of objects and fine art is great and includes a wide range of materials, from aquarels to etchings and embroideries, including approximately 600 maritime paintings.
The Gram collection is a separate collection of fine art with paintings made by Norwegian artists. The collection shows a variation of ships and boats common in Norwegian waters. Depicted in different environments they also contribute to an understanding of Norwegian maritime life in the late 1800s and early 1900s.